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Activity Procedure

Nuts and Bolts Opening Hook: (15 minutes) 

Procedure 

To do in advance: 

  1. Get out banner paper and markers. Tape two pieces of banner paper onto the floor in separate areas. 
  2. Get out speaker and have “Robots” by Dan Mangan ready. 

During: 

  1. Ask the participants what they think of when they hear the word robot.
  2. Make a quick brainstorm. 
  3. Split the group into two. 
  4. Have two pieces of banner paper taped onto the floor. 
  5. One group will start by drawing what they think a robot looks like, and drawing or writing the characteristics of the robot on the paper. 
  6. The other group will draw a human (trace someone!) and draw or write the characteristics of a human. 
  7. Switch after 10 minutes, see if the groups have anything to add to the robot/human. 
  8. After 15 minutes, gather together, tape the pictures on the wall. 

After: 

  1. Ask them how the robot and the human are different? How are they the same? Did we miss any characteristics of either of them.

Extensions:

  1. Put the camp into smaller groups and get them to draw both independently, then meet together as a group to go over it.

Activity #1: What is Intelligence? (15 minutes) 

Procedure 

To do in advance: 

  1. Get out object cards. 

During: 

  1. Ask the participants if they have ever heard of “Artificial Intelligence” before. Write it up so they can see it. 
  2. Break down the phrase into the two words. Ask the participants what “Artificial” means. What types of things are artificial… what is the opposite of artificial? 
  3. Ask the participants what they think intelligent means. What qualities do people/things possess if they are intelligent? 
  4. Explain to the campers that they will, in groups, receive a stack of objects on cards. Each card will have something on it. As a group, they will have to decide their order of intelligence. There will be 5 set of cards, so make groups accordingly. 
  5. Once the participants have finished ordering the objects, get together and ask which objects were the most intelligent, the least intelligent and why. 

Explanation of some of the cards:

These cards are meant to engage the campers in a discussion based on how they define intelligence, many of these objects are intelligent, but in very different ways. Below are some explanations for each of the cards, the participants should be thinking of emotional, intellectual, and reactive types of intelligence.

Adult/Baby: Adults would be the most intelligent in terms of emotional and reactive intelligence. It would be interesting to think if the robot is intellectually more intelligent than the adult. Depends on the adult and the robot. 

Sphero/Micro:bit: We have been using them throughout camp, how are they intelligent? Can they follow instructions and learn? Which one is more intelligent? Which one can do more things? 

Goldfish: Has a memory that lasts only up to five months, although there is a myth that it lasts only a few seconds. 

iPhone: It can do many things and even learns about your preferences. What kinds of apps can you have on your iPhone?

Dog/Seal/Pig: Dogs are a human’s best friend, pigs are known to be clever and seals can survive in the arctic ocean. How do animals communicate? Can they learn? Can they communicate with people? 

Rockets: think of what rockets are coded to do on the inside, what type of artificial intelligence is required for this?

Plants: The flower and apple must know how to grow in their genetic make-up, but can they communicate or move out of harm’s way? 

After: 

  1. There are no completely right answers! Ask the participants why they think the object that is last is least intelligent? Why do they think the object that is first is the most intelligent? 
  2. Ask the participants a series of questions and get them to raise their hands if they can, here are some questions. Ensure questions are asked in an inclusive and culturally safe manner and youth are not being singled out by others. a. Can you solve a problem? b. Can you find food? c. Do you build/effectively use tools? d. Can you communicate? e. Can you move? f. Can you feel emotions? g. Can you react? h. Etc. 
  3. This discussion is meant to talk about different types of intelligence, for example a plant can feed itself, but if something is coming towards it that will hurt it, it can’t get out of the way. It also can’t communicate and/or feel to ask for help.

Activity #2: Baymax!– 15 minutes 

Procedure 

To do before: 

  1. Set up the projector, speaker and videos. 
  2. Get the story book out. 

To do during: 

  1. Ask the participants if they have seen Big Hero 6. If they have, do they remember Baymax? Who is Baymax, what does he do? Who made him? 
  2. Read the campers the story. 
  3. Show the campers some of the videos you have. 
  4. While you are watching and reading, ask the campers what happens when Baymax does something new? Can Baymax learn? 
  5. Do the campers think it might be cool/helpful to have a robotic nurse? Relate this back to telehealth. Would they be comfortable with Baymax?

Extensions: 1. Have an older camper read the story to the rest of the camp. 

Modifications: 1. Choose one video or just read the story.

Activity #3: The Turing Test – 25 minutes 

Procedure 

To do before: 

  1. Do you have cell reception? If you do, use your phone. If you don’t act it out! 

To do during: 

  1. Explain to the campers what chatbots are. They are computer programs that humans are able to talk to. These chatbots have AI. There is a competition every year that tests how “human like” the chat bots are. The way they test them is through the “turing test” where an expert asks a human and a computer questions, not knowing who is who. They then try to guess which is the robot. 
  2. Ask the campers to write down (you may have to help them) questions that they think will trip up the robots. If they are having trouble, there are some questions below. 
  3. Ask participants “What sort of questions and responses PROVE that someone is human?” 4. One camper will ask two instructors a question, one instructor is a robot, and one is a human. The instructors will respond, and the participant will guess who is a robot. If you have cell service, they could ask the question via text and receive two texts back, they then have to guess which text is from a robot. 

Here are some questions to trip up robots:

  1. Do you have feelings?

a. (Siri: Hmmm…. Let me feel. Nope, nothing.)

       2. Do you drink water?

                a. I have a thirst for knowledge.

       3. What is your favorite food?

       4. What is your favorite song? 

       5. Can you give me a high 5? etc. 

Extensions:

  1. Have campers be the robots/humans and get other campers to guess. 

Modifications:

  1. Write down questions in advance. Ask the instructors and get the campers to guess.

Activity #4: Chatterbox – 20 minutes 

Procedure 

To do before: 

  1. Read the Google “ikeepsafe” write up before you do this activity. 
  2. Get out laptops and open ActuChat on Scratch. 

To do during: 

  1. Do activity “Share with care” pg. 8-11 in Google “ikeepsafe” document, discuss internet safety. 
  2. Review what chatbots are. Tell the participants they are going to talk to a chatbot. Pair them into 10 groups. Put older participants with younger ones- if there is a group unable to type an instructor needs to go with them. 
  3. Instruct the groups to make a fictional character to talk to the chat bot with, refer to the internet safety discussion that you just had with them. 
  4. The campers will then get to play on Scratch with ActuChat to experience what a “chat bot” acts like. 
  5. Ask the participants to look at the code, how does the computer program know how to respond? Do they think they could have any conversation with it, or only what it asked? 

After: 

  1. What did they think of the chatbot? 2. Look through the code. Could they build a chatbot? How does it work? 

Extensions:

  1. Ask the campers to create their own chatbot. 

Modifications:

  1. Do this as a group with the projector.

Activity #5: The Uncanny Valley – 25 minutes 

Procedure 

To do before: 

  1. Link your computer to the projector and have some of the videos ready to show.

To do during: 

  1. Watch the Uncanny Valley video. 
  2. Draw the graph with the kids. Show them some of the videos, put where they think the robots are on the graph. 
  3. Show the campers some of the laminated pictures, where would they put these robots on the graph? Why?

Activity #6: Dragon’s Den 

Procedure 

To do in advance: 

  1. Read Forbes Magazine article: 27 Incredible examples of AI and Machine Learning in Practice

a. Cool examples of AI to bring up:

i. Hello Barbie doll – microphone on Barbie’s necklace records what is said by the child, it then goes to a server                    and AI analyzes the best response from approximately 8000 different options. It can also store answers to                            questions so the doll can use it again later.

ii. Coca Cola uses the mass amounts of data it collects and has used new technology (AI) to figure out                                      consumer trends and support new product development.

     iii. A robotic sous chef that can help with recipes and advice on food and flavor combinations

iv. Algorithms that generate music are inspiring new songs because the AI helps the musicians understand                           what their audience wants to hear.

During: 

  1. As a group talk about what AI is, ask what types of things do participants see around them that have AI? What types of things would the participants like to see to help them in their day to day lives? 
  2. Break them up into small groups of 3-4 (max of 6) and give them 5 minutes to brainstorm all the “problems” or difficult things that they come across in their day to day lives (ex. Homework, tying their shoes, doing laundry, cooking dinner, etc.). 
  3. After the five minutes, ask them to stop and pick their favorite problem. 
  4. Ask the participants to come up with an AI device that could help them solve their problem. They can create a small poster with a drawing and description. What would the AI be focused on? What would its code have to have in it? How would it learn? 

After:

  1.  Get each group to introduce their AI invention. Ask the group if they have any other ideas of cool AI devices in the future? Ask them if they think AI is useful? 

Extensions:

  1. Ask the participants to code something on Scratch to represent their AI device. 

Modifications:

  1. Have the participants do a gallery walk instead of presenting (put the posters on walls and get the groups to walk around the room and read independently).

 

Extensions & Modifications

The extensions and modifications immediately follow each individual activities procedure above

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